Bizzare News

http://www.bizzarenews.net/what-will-it-take-to-solve-colony-collapse-disorder/What Will It Take To Solve Colony Collapse Disorder?


				                    
																														


													



From TakePart’s Willy Blackmore: 
Late last month 25,000 bumblebees fell out of the linden trees planted around a Target parking lot in Wilsonville, Oregon, all dead. Pesticides were immediately blamed. Despite printed warnings on neonicotinoid-type bug killers stating that they should not be sprayed when bees are present, the flowering lindens were doused with Safari Insecticide, causing what The Xerces Society calls the largest mass death of bumblebees ever recorded in the United States.
Just over a month before the bees died in Oregon, the European Union passed a continent-wide ban on neonicotinoids—legislation that environmental groups praised as a significant move to curb Colony Collapse Disorder, the somewhat misleadingly distinct name given to the little-understood deaths of some 10 million hives’ worth of bees in the last six years. Oregon issued a temporary ban on the pesticides too, but nothing as broad as the European law is being considered nationally—and that may not be such a bad thing, because a new study published today in the journal PLOS ONE suggests that CCD is by no means a one-chemical problem.
“The pesticide issue in itself is much more complex than we have [been] led to believe,” the study’s lead author, Dennis vanEngelsdorp, tells Quartz. “It’s a lot more complicated than just one product, which means of course the solution does not lie in just banning one class of product.”
The research conducted by scientists at the University of Maryland and the USDA looked at the pollen honey bees brought back after pollinating a diverse group of crops: almonds, apples, blueberries, cranberries, cucumber, watermelon and pumpkins. While neonicotinoids were detected in the study, they only showed up in the pollen collected from the apple orchard.
But that’s not to say that agirucltural chemicals weren’t making their way back to the hive: “We detected 35 different pesticides in the sampled pollen, and found high fungicide loads,” the study reads. It has previously been believed that fungicides did not pose a risk to honey bees—Quartz notes that they do not bear the same warming labels about spraying them around pollinators as insecticides do—but the Maryland and USDA scientists “found an increased probability” of bees being infected by the gut pathogen Nosema ceranae when exposed to high levels of fungicides. The fungal disease can “adversely affect honey bee colony health, and can result in complete colony collapse.”
If the U.S. had banned neonicotinoids along with the E.U., there might be 25,000 more bumblebees in Oregon. But outlawing a single class of pesticides won’t solve CCD. The PLUS ONE study hasn’t identified any smoking gun either, but by offering proof that the problem is exceedingly complex, it may help engender a more nuanced, effective solution.
Also on HuffPost:

								“;
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http://www.bizzarenews.net/what-will-it-take-to-solve-colony-collapse-disorder/

What Will It Take To Solve Colony Collapse Disorder?

Colony Collapse Disorder

From TakePart’s Willy Blackmore:

Late last month 25,000 bumblebees fell out of the linden trees planted around a Target parking lot in Wilsonville, Oregon, all dead. Pesticides were immediately blamed. Despite printed warnings on neonicotinoid-type bug killers stating that they should not be sprayed when bees are present, the flowering lindens were doused with Safari Insecticide, causing what The Xerces Society calls the largest mass death of bumblebees ever recorded in the United States.

Just over a month before the bees died in Oregon, the European Union passed a continent-wide ban on neonicotinoids—legislation that environmental groups praised as a significant move to curb Colony Collapse Disorder, the somewhat misleadingly distinct name given to the little-understood deaths of some 10 million hives’ worth of bees in the last six years. Oregon issued a temporary ban on the pesticides too, but nothing as broad as the European law is being considered nationally—and that may not be such a bad thing, because a new study published today in the journal PLOS ONE suggests that CCD is by no means a one-chemical problem.

“The pesticide issue in itself is much more complex than we have [been] led to believe,” the study’s lead author, Dennis vanEngelsdorp, tells Quartz. “It’s a lot more complicated than just one product, which means of course the solution does not lie in just banning one class of product.”

The research conducted by scientists at the University of Maryland and the USDA looked at the pollen honey bees brought back after pollinating a diverse group of crops: almonds, apples, blueberries, cranberries, cucumber, watermelon and pumpkins. While neonicotinoids were detected in the study, they only showed up in the pollen collected from the apple orchard.

But that’s not to say that agirucltural chemicals weren’t making their way back to the hive: “We detected 35 different pesticides in the sampled pollen, and found high fungicide loads,” the study reads. It has previously been believed that fungicides did not pose a risk to honey bees—Quartz notes that they do not bear the same warming labels about spraying them around pollinators as insecticides do—but the Maryland and USDA scientists “found an increased probability” of bees being infected by the gut pathogen Nosema ceranae when exposed to high levels of fungicides. The fungal disease can “adversely affect honey bee colony health, and can result in complete colony collapse.”

If the U.S. had banned neonicotinoids along with the E.U., there might be 25,000 more bumblebees in Oregon. But outlawing a single class of pesticides won’t solve CCD. The PLUS ONE study hasn’t identified any smoking gun either, but by offering proof that the problem is exceedingly complex, it may help engender a more nuanced, effective solution.

Also on HuffPost:

“;
var coords = [-5, -72];
// display fb-bubble
FloatingPrompt.embed(this, html, undefined, ‘top’, {fp_intersects:1, timeout_remove:2000,ignore_arrow: true, width:236, add_xy:coords, class_name: ‘clear-overlay’});
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http://www.bizzarenews.net/what-will-it-take-to-solve-colony-collapse-disorder-2/What Will It Take To Solve Colony Collapse Disorder?


				                    
																														


													



From TakePart’s Willy Blackmore: 
Late last month 25,000 bumblebees fell out of the linden trees planted around a Target parking lot in Wilsonville, Oregon, all dead. Pesticides were immediately blamed. Despite printed warnings on neonicotinoid-type bug killers stating that they should not be sprayed when bees are present, the flowering lindens were doused with Safari Insecticide, causing what The Xerces Society calls the largest mass death of bumblebees ever recorded in the United States.
Just over a month before the bees died in Oregon, the European Union passed a continent-wide ban on neonicotinoids—legislation that environmental groups praised as a significant move to curb Colony Collapse Disorder, the somewhat misleadingly distinct name given to the little-understood deaths of some 10 million hives’ worth of bees in the last six years. Oregon issued a temporary ban on the pesticides too, but nothing as broad as the European law is being considered nationally—and that may not be such a bad thing, because a new study published today in the journal PLOS ONE suggests that CCD is by no means a one-chemical problem.
“The pesticide issue in itself is much more complex than we have [been] led to believe,” the study’s lead author, Dennis vanEngelsdorp, tells Quartz. “It’s a lot more complicated than just one product, which means of course the solution does not lie in just banning one class of product.”
The research conducted by scientists at the University of Maryland and the USDA looked at the pollen honey bees brought back after pollinating a diverse group of crops: almonds, apples, blueberries, cranberries, cucumber, watermelon and pumpkins. While neonicotinoids were detected in the study, they only showed up in the pollen collected from the apple orchard.
But that’s not to say that agirucltural chemicals weren’t making their way back to the hive: “We detected 35 different pesticides in the sampled pollen, and found high fungicide loads,” the study reads. It has previously been believed that fungicides did not pose a risk to honey bees—Quartz notes that they do not bear the same warming labels about spraying them around pollinators as insecticides do—but the Maryland and USDA scientists “found an increased probability” of bees being infected by the gut pathogen Nosema ceranae when exposed to high levels of fungicides. The fungal disease can “adversely affect honey bee colony health, and can result in complete colony collapse.”
If the U.S. had banned neonicotinoids along with the E.U., there might be 25,000 more bumblebees in Oregon. But outlawing a single class of pesticides won’t solve CCD. The PLUS ONE study hasn’t identified any smoking gun either, but by offering proof that the problem is exceedingly complex, it may help engender a more nuanced, effective solution.
Also on HuffPost:

								“;
	var coords = [-5, -72];
	// display fb-bubble
	FloatingPrompt.embed(this, html, undefined, ‘top’, {fp_intersects:1, timeout_remove:2000,ignore_arrow: true, width:236, add_xy:coords, class_name: ‘clear-overlay’});
});

http://www.bizzarenews.net/what-will-it-take-to-solve-colony-collapse-disorder-2/

What Will It Take To Solve Colony Collapse Disorder?

Colony Collapse Disorder

From TakePart’s Willy Blackmore:

Late last month 25,000 bumblebees fell out of the linden trees planted around a Target parking lot in Wilsonville, Oregon, all dead. Pesticides were immediately blamed. Despite printed warnings on neonicotinoid-type bug killers stating that they should not be sprayed when bees are present, the flowering lindens were doused with Safari Insecticide, causing what The Xerces Society calls the largest mass death of bumblebees ever recorded in the United States.

Just over a month before the bees died in Oregon, the European Union passed a continent-wide ban on neonicotinoids—legislation that environmental groups praised as a significant move to curb Colony Collapse Disorder, the somewhat misleadingly distinct name given to the little-understood deaths of some 10 million hives’ worth of bees in the last six years. Oregon issued a temporary ban on the pesticides too, but nothing as broad as the European law is being considered nationally—and that may not be such a bad thing, because a new study published today in the journal PLOS ONE suggests that CCD is by no means a one-chemical problem.

“The pesticide issue in itself is much more complex than we have [been] led to believe,” the study’s lead author, Dennis vanEngelsdorp, tells Quartz. “It’s a lot more complicated than just one product, which means of course the solution does not lie in just banning one class of product.”

The research conducted by scientists at the University of Maryland and the USDA looked at the pollen honey bees brought back after pollinating a diverse group of crops: almonds, apples, blueberries, cranberries, cucumber, watermelon and pumpkins. While neonicotinoids were detected in the study, they only showed up in the pollen collected from the apple orchard.

But that’s not to say that agirucltural chemicals weren’t making their way back to the hive: “We detected 35 different pesticides in the sampled pollen, and found high fungicide loads,” the study reads. It has previously been believed that fungicides did not pose a risk to honey bees—Quartz notes that they do not bear the same warming labels about spraying them around pollinators as insecticides do—but the Maryland and USDA scientists “found an increased probability” of bees being infected by the gut pathogen Nosema ceranae when exposed to high levels of fungicides. The fungal disease can “adversely affect honey bee colony health, and can result in complete colony collapse.”

If the U.S. had banned neonicotinoids along with the E.U., there might be 25,000 more bumblebees in Oregon. But outlawing a single class of pesticides won’t solve CCD. The PLUS ONE study hasn’t identified any smoking gun either, but by offering proof that the problem is exceedingly complex, it may help engender a more nuanced, effective solution.

Also on HuffPost:

“;
var coords = [-5, -72];
// display fb-bubble
FloatingPrompt.embed(this, html, undefined, ‘top’, {fp_intersects:1, timeout_remove:2000,ignore_arrow: true, width:236, add_xy:coords, class_name: ‘clear-overlay’});
});

http://www.bizzarenews.net/what-will-it-take-to-solve-colony-collapse-disorder-2/What Will It Take To Solve Colony Collapse Disorder?


				                    
																														


													



From TakePart’s Willy Blackmore: 
Late last month 25,000 bumblebees fell out of the linden trees planted around a Target parking lot in Wilsonville, Oregon, all dead. Pesticides were immediately blamed. Despite printed warnings on neonicotinoid-type bug killers stating that they should not be sprayed when bees are present, the flowering lindens were doused with Safari Insecticide, causing what The Xerces Society calls the largest mass death of bumblebees ever recorded in the United States.
Just over a month before the bees died in Oregon, the European Union passed a continent-wide ban on neonicotinoids—legislation that environmental groups praised as a significant move to curb Colony Collapse Disorder, the somewhat misleadingly distinct name given to the little-understood deaths of some 10 million hives’ worth of bees in the last six years. Oregon issued a temporary ban on the pesticides too, but nothing as broad as the European law is being considered nationally—and that may not be such a bad thing, because a new study published today in the journal PLOS ONE suggests that CCD is by no means a one-chemical problem.
“The pesticide issue in itself is much more complex than we have [been] led to believe,” the study’s lead author, Dennis vanEngelsdorp, tells Quartz. “It’s a lot more complicated than just one product, which means of course the solution does not lie in just banning one class of product.”
The research conducted by scientists at the University of Maryland and the USDA looked at the pollen honey bees brought back after pollinating a diverse group of crops: almonds, apples, blueberries, cranberries, cucumber, watermelon and pumpkins. While neonicotinoids were detected in the study, they only showed up in the pollen collected from the apple orchard.
But that’s not to say that agirucltural chemicals weren’t making their way back to the hive: “We detected 35 different pesticides in the sampled pollen, and found high fungicide loads,” the study reads. It has previously been believed that fungicides did not pose a risk to honey bees—Quartz notes that they do not bear the same warming labels about spraying them around pollinators as insecticides do—but the Maryland and USDA scientists “found an increased probability” of bees being infected by the gut pathogen Nosema ceranae when exposed to high levels of fungicides. The fungal disease can “adversely affect honey bee colony health, and can result in complete colony collapse.”
If the U.S. had banned neonicotinoids along with the E.U., there might be 25,000 more bumblebees in Oregon. But outlawing a single class of pesticides won’t solve CCD. The PLUS ONE study hasn’t identified any smoking gun either, but by offering proof that the problem is exceedingly complex, it may help engender a more nuanced, effective solution.
Also on HuffPost:

								“;
	var coords = [-5, -72];
	// display fb-bubble
	FloatingPrompt.embed(this, html, undefined, ‘top’, {fp_intersects:1, timeout_remove:2000,ignore_arrow: true, width:236, add_xy:coords, class_name: ‘clear-overlay’});
});

http://www.bizzarenews.net/what-will-it-take-to-solve-colony-collapse-disorder-2/

What Will It Take To Solve Colony Collapse Disorder?

Colony Collapse Disorder

From TakePart’s Willy Blackmore:

Late last month 25,000 bumblebees fell out of the linden trees planted around a Target parking lot in Wilsonville, Oregon, all dead. Pesticides were immediately blamed. Despite printed warnings on neonicotinoid-type bug killers stating that they should not be sprayed when bees are present, the flowering lindens were doused with Safari Insecticide, causing what The Xerces Society calls the largest mass death of bumblebees ever recorded in the United States.

Just over a month before the bees died in Oregon, the European Union passed a continent-wide ban on neonicotinoids—legislation that environmental groups praised as a significant move to curb Colony Collapse Disorder, the somewhat misleadingly distinct name given to the little-understood deaths of some 10 million hives’ worth of bees in the last six years. Oregon issued a temporary ban on the pesticides too, but nothing as broad as the European law is being considered nationally—and that may not be such a bad thing, because a new study published today in the journal PLOS ONE suggests that CCD is by no means a one-chemical problem.

“The pesticide issue in itself is much more complex than we have [been] led to believe,” the study’s lead author, Dennis vanEngelsdorp, tells Quartz. “It’s a lot more complicated than just one product, which means of course the solution does not lie in just banning one class of product.”

The research conducted by scientists at the University of Maryland and the USDA looked at the pollen honey bees brought back after pollinating a diverse group of crops: almonds, apples, blueberries, cranberries, cucumber, watermelon and pumpkins. While neonicotinoids were detected in the study, they only showed up in the pollen collected from the apple orchard.

But that’s not to say that agirucltural chemicals weren’t making their way back to the hive: “We detected 35 different pesticides in the sampled pollen, and found high fungicide loads,” the study reads. It has previously been believed that fungicides did not pose a risk to honey bees—Quartz notes that they do not bear the same warming labels about spraying them around pollinators as insecticides do—but the Maryland and USDA scientists “found an increased probability” of bees being infected by the gut pathogen Nosema ceranae when exposed to high levels of fungicides. The fungal disease can “adversely affect honey bee colony health, and can result in complete colony collapse.”

If the U.S. had banned neonicotinoids along with the E.U., there might be 25,000 more bumblebees in Oregon. But outlawing a single class of pesticides won’t solve CCD. The PLUS ONE study hasn’t identified any smoking gun either, but by offering proof that the problem is exceedingly complex, it may help engender a more nuanced, effective solution.

Also on HuffPost:

“;
var coords = [-5, -72];
// display fb-bubble
FloatingPrompt.embed(this, html, undefined, ‘top’, {fp_intersects:1, timeout_remove:2000,ignore_arrow: true, width:236, add_xy:coords, class_name: ‘clear-overlay’});
});

http://www.bizzarenews.net/what-will-it-take-to-solve-colony-collapse-disorder-2/What Will It Take To Solve Colony Collapse Disorder?


				                    
																														


													



From TakePart’s Willy Blackmore: 
Late last month 25,000 bumblebees fell out of the linden trees planted around a Target parking lot in Wilsonville, Oregon, all dead. Pesticides were immediately blamed. Despite printed warnings on neonicotinoid-type bug killers stating that they should not be sprayed when bees are present, the flowering lindens were doused with Safari Insecticide, causing what The Xerces Society calls the largest mass death of bumblebees ever recorded in the United States.
Just over a month before the bees died in Oregon, the European Union passed a continent-wide ban on neonicotinoids—legislation that environmental groups praised as a significant move to curb Colony Collapse Disorder, the somewhat misleadingly distinct name given to the little-understood deaths of some 10 million hives’ worth of bees in the last six years. Oregon issued a temporary ban on the pesticides too, but nothing as broad as the European law is being considered nationally—and that may not be such a bad thing, because a new study published today in the journal PLOS ONE suggests that CCD is by no means a one-chemical problem.
“The pesticide issue in itself is much more complex than we have [been] led to believe,” the study’s lead author, Dennis vanEngelsdorp, tells Quartz. “It’s a lot more complicated than just one product, which means of course the solution does not lie in just banning one class of product.”
The research conducted by scientists at the University of Maryland and the USDA looked at the pollen honey bees brought back after pollinating a diverse group of crops: almonds, apples, blueberries, cranberries, cucumber, watermelon and pumpkins. While neonicotinoids were detected in the study, they only showed up in the pollen collected from the apple orchard.
But that’s not to say that agirucltural chemicals weren’t making their way back to the hive: “We detected 35 different pesticides in the sampled pollen, and found high fungicide loads,” the study reads. It has previously been believed that fungicides did not pose a risk to honey bees—Quartz notes that they do not bear the same warming labels about spraying them around pollinators as insecticides do—but the Maryland and USDA scientists “found an increased probability” of bees being infected by the gut pathogen Nosema ceranae when exposed to high levels of fungicides. The fungal disease can “adversely affect honey bee colony health, and can result in complete colony collapse.”
If the U.S. had banned neonicotinoids along with the E.U., there might be 25,000 more bumblebees in Oregon. But outlawing a single class of pesticides won’t solve CCD. The PLUS ONE study hasn’t identified any smoking gun either, but by offering proof that the problem is exceedingly complex, it may help engender a more nuanced, effective solution.
Also on HuffPost:

								“;
	var coords = [-5, -72];
	// display fb-bubble
	FloatingPrompt.embed(this, html, undefined, ‘top’, {fp_intersects:1, timeout_remove:2000,ignore_arrow: true, width:236, add_xy:coords, class_name: ‘clear-overlay’});
});

http://www.bizzarenews.net/what-will-it-take-to-solve-colony-collapse-disorder-2/

What Will It Take To Solve Colony Collapse Disorder?

Colony Collapse Disorder

From TakePart’s Willy Blackmore:

Late last month 25,000 bumblebees fell out of the linden trees planted around a Target parking lot in Wilsonville, Oregon, all dead. Pesticides were immediately blamed. Despite printed warnings on neonicotinoid-type bug killers stating that they should not be sprayed when bees are present, the flowering lindens were doused with Safari Insecticide, causing what The Xerces Society calls the largest mass death of bumblebees ever recorded in the United States.

Just over a month before the bees died in Oregon, the European Union passed a continent-wide ban on neonicotinoids—legislation that environmental groups praised as a significant move to curb Colony Collapse Disorder, the somewhat misleadingly distinct name given to the little-understood deaths of some 10 million hives’ worth of bees in the last six years. Oregon issued a temporary ban on the pesticides too, but nothing as broad as the European law is being considered nationally—and that may not be such a bad thing, because a new study published today in the journal PLOS ONE suggests that CCD is by no means a one-chemical problem.

“The pesticide issue in itself is much more complex than we have [been] led to believe,” the study’s lead author, Dennis vanEngelsdorp, tells Quartz. “It’s a lot more complicated than just one product, which means of course the solution does not lie in just banning one class of product.”

The research conducted by scientists at the University of Maryland and the USDA looked at the pollen honey bees brought back after pollinating a diverse group of crops: almonds, apples, blueberries, cranberries, cucumber, watermelon and pumpkins. While neonicotinoids were detected in the study, they only showed up in the pollen collected from the apple orchard.

But that’s not to say that agirucltural chemicals weren’t making their way back to the hive: “We detected 35 different pesticides in the sampled pollen, and found high fungicide loads,” the study reads. It has previously been believed that fungicides did not pose a risk to honey bees—Quartz notes that they do not bear the same warming labels about spraying them around pollinators as insecticides do—but the Maryland and USDA scientists “found an increased probability” of bees being infected by the gut pathogen Nosema ceranae when exposed to high levels of fungicides. The fungal disease can “adversely affect honey bee colony health, and can result in complete colony collapse.”

If the U.S. had banned neonicotinoids along with the E.U., there might be 25,000 more bumblebees in Oregon. But outlawing a single class of pesticides won’t solve CCD. The PLUS ONE study hasn’t identified any smoking gun either, but by offering proof that the problem is exceedingly complex, it may help engender a more nuanced, effective solution.

Also on HuffPost:

“;
var coords = [-5, -72];
// display fb-bubble
FloatingPrompt.embed(this, html, undefined, ‘top’, {fp_intersects:1, timeout_remove:2000,ignore_arrow: true, width:236, add_xy:coords, class_name: ‘clear-overlay’});
});

http://www.bizzarenews.net/what-will-it-take-to-solve-colony-collapse-disorder-2/What Will It Take To Solve Colony Collapse Disorder?


				                    
																														


													



From TakePart’s Willy Blackmore: 
Late last month 25,000 bumblebees fell out of the linden trees planted around a Target parking lot in Wilsonville, Oregon, all dead. Pesticides were immediately blamed. Despite printed warnings on neonicotinoid-type bug killers stating that they should not be sprayed when bees are present, the flowering lindens were doused with Safari Insecticide, causing what The Xerces Society calls the largest mass death of bumblebees ever recorded in the United States.
Just over a month before the bees died in Oregon, the European Union passed a continent-wide ban on neonicotinoids—legislation that environmental groups praised as a significant move to curb Colony Collapse Disorder, the somewhat misleadingly distinct name given to the little-understood deaths of some 10 million hives’ worth of bees in the last six years. Oregon issued a temporary ban on the pesticides too, but nothing as broad as the European law is being considered nationally—and that may not be such a bad thing, because a new study published today in the journal PLOS ONE suggests that CCD is by no means a one-chemical problem.
“The pesticide issue in itself is much more complex than we have [been] led to believe,” the study’s lead author, Dennis vanEngelsdorp, tells Quartz. “It’s a lot more complicated than just one product, which means of course the solution does not lie in just banning one class of product.”
The research conducted by scientists at the University of Maryland and the USDA looked at the pollen honey bees brought back after pollinating a diverse group of crops: almonds, apples, blueberries, cranberries, cucumber, watermelon and pumpkins. While neonicotinoids were detected in the study, they only showed up in the pollen collected from the apple orchard.
But that’s not to say that agirucltural chemicals weren’t making their way back to the hive: “We detected 35 different pesticides in the sampled pollen, and found high fungicide loads,” the study reads. It has previously been believed that fungicides did not pose a risk to honey bees—Quartz notes that they do not bear the same warming labels about spraying them around pollinators as insecticides do—but the Maryland and USDA scientists “found an increased probability” of bees being infected by the gut pathogen Nosema ceranae when exposed to high levels of fungicides. The fungal disease can “adversely affect honey bee colony health, and can result in complete colony collapse.”
If the U.S. had banned neonicotinoids along with the E.U., there might be 25,000 more bumblebees in Oregon. But outlawing a single class of pesticides won’t solve CCD. The PLUS ONE study hasn’t identified any smoking gun either, but by offering proof that the problem is exceedingly complex, it may help engender a more nuanced, effective solution.
Also on HuffPost:

								“;
	var coords = [-5, -72];
	// display fb-bubble
	FloatingPrompt.embed(this, html, undefined, ‘top’, {fp_intersects:1, timeout_remove:2000,ignore_arrow: true, width:236, add_xy:coords, class_name: ‘clear-overlay’});
});

http://www.bizzarenews.net/what-will-it-take-to-solve-colony-collapse-disorder-2/

What Will It Take To Solve Colony Collapse Disorder?

Colony Collapse Disorder

From TakePart’s Willy Blackmore:

Late last month 25,000 bumblebees fell out of the linden trees planted around a Target parking lot in Wilsonville, Oregon, all dead. Pesticides were immediately blamed. Despite printed warnings on neonicotinoid-type bug killers stating that they should not be sprayed when bees are present, the flowering lindens were doused with Safari Insecticide, causing what The Xerces Society calls the largest mass death of bumblebees ever recorded in the United States.

Just over a month before the bees died in Oregon, the European Union passed a continent-wide ban on neonicotinoids—legislation that environmental groups praised as a significant move to curb Colony Collapse Disorder, the somewhat misleadingly distinct name given to the little-understood deaths of some 10 million hives’ worth of bees in the last six years. Oregon issued a temporary ban on the pesticides too, but nothing as broad as the European law is being considered nationally—and that may not be such a bad thing, because a new study published today in the journal PLOS ONE suggests that CCD is by no means a one-chemical problem.

“The pesticide issue in itself is much more complex than we have [been] led to believe,” the study’s lead author, Dennis vanEngelsdorp, tells Quartz. “It’s a lot more complicated than just one product, which means of course the solution does not lie in just banning one class of product.”

The research conducted by scientists at the University of Maryland and the USDA looked at the pollen honey bees brought back after pollinating a diverse group of crops: almonds, apples, blueberries, cranberries, cucumber, watermelon and pumpkins. While neonicotinoids were detected in the study, they only showed up in the pollen collected from the apple orchard.

But that’s not to say that agirucltural chemicals weren’t making their way back to the hive: “We detected 35 different pesticides in the sampled pollen, and found high fungicide loads,” the study reads. It has previously been believed that fungicides did not pose a risk to honey bees—Quartz notes that they do not bear the same warming labels about spraying them around pollinators as insecticides do—but the Maryland and USDA scientists “found an increased probability” of bees being infected by the gut pathogen Nosema ceranae when exposed to high levels of fungicides. The fungal disease can “adversely affect honey bee colony health, and can result in complete colony collapse.”

If the U.S. had banned neonicotinoids along with the E.U., there might be 25,000 more bumblebees in Oregon. But outlawing a single class of pesticides won’t solve CCD. The PLUS ONE study hasn’t identified any smoking gun either, but by offering proof that the problem is exceedingly complex, it may help engender a more nuanced, effective solution.

Also on HuffPost:

“;
var coords = [-5, -72];
// display fb-bubble
FloatingPrompt.embed(this, html, undefined, ‘top’, {fp_intersects:1, timeout_remove:2000,ignore_arrow: true, width:236, add_xy:coords, class_name: ‘clear-overlay’});
});

http://www.bizzarenews.net/woman-claims-to-be-the-worlds-oldest-person-2/Woman Claims To Be The World’s Oldest Person


				                    


Having lived through British imperialism, apartheid and the era of democracy led by Nelson Mandela, a 119-year-old South African woman has a claim to be the world’s oldest person.
Johanna Mazibuko was born in 1894, according to her identity papers, but over a century later still makes her own bed every morning.
“I’m doing alright,” she told local daily The Sowetan during a recent visit to her house in the small town of Klerksdorp, northwest of Johannesburg.
She is the oldest of 10 siblings, and has outlived five of her own seven children.
“God gave my life in abundance, plus a bonus. I am very old now,” she said.
Her son Tseko, himself a ripe 77, who lives with his mother, said that “she is able to move on her own but cannot stand for a long time. She gets dizzy.”
Despite her age, Mazibuko cooks and dresses herself, and even does the laundry.
The rest of the day she watches television.
A tattered green ID book gives her date of birth as May 11, 1894. It was issued in 1986.
South Africa’s home affairs ministry could not immediately confirm the authenticity of Mazibuko’s identity documents, of which AFP has seen a copy.
The world’s oldest known person, 116-year-old Jiroemon Kimura from Japan, died in June.
Born in 1897, he worked at a post office for 40 years and after his retirement took up farming until he turned 90.
His hometown Kyotango is planning to do research into the reasons for its citizens’ longevity.
Besides Kimura 94 other people in his hometown will this year be 100 years old or older.

Also on HuffPost:

								“;
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http://www.bizzarenews.net/woman-claims-to-be-the-worlds-oldest-person-2/

Woman Claims To Be The World’s Oldest Person

Having lived through British imperialism, apartheid and the era of democracy led by Nelson Mandela, a 119-year-old South African woman has a claim to be the world’s oldest person.

Johanna Mazibuko was born in 1894, according to her identity papers, but over a century later still makes her own bed every morning.

“I’m doing alright,” she told local daily The Sowetan during a recent visit to her house in the small town of Klerksdorp, northwest of Johannesburg.

She is the oldest of 10 siblings, and has outlived five of her own seven children.

“God gave my life in abundance, plus a bonus. I am very old now,” she said.

Her son Tseko, himself a ripe 77, who lives with his mother, said that “she is able to move on her own but cannot stand for a long time. She gets dizzy.”

Despite her age, Mazibuko cooks and dresses herself, and even does the laundry.

The rest of the day she watches television.

A tattered green ID book gives her date of birth as May 11, 1894. It was issued in 1986.

South Africa’s home affairs ministry could not immediately confirm the authenticity of Mazibuko’s identity documents, of which AFP has seen a copy.

The world’s oldest known person, 116-year-old Jiroemon Kimura from Japan, died in June.

Born in 1897, he worked at a post office for 40 years and after his retirement took up farming until he turned 90.

His hometown Kyotango is planning to do research into the reasons for its citizens’ longevity.

Besides Kimura 94 other people in his hometown will this year be 100 years old or older.



Also on HuffPost:

“;
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});

http://www.bizzarenews.net/woman-claims-to-be-the-worlds-oldest-person-3/Woman Claims To Be The World’s Oldest Person


				                    


Having lived through British imperialism, apartheid and the era of democracy led by Nelson Mandela, a 119-year-old South African woman has a claim to be the world’s oldest person.
Johanna Mazibuko was born in 1894, according to her identity papers, but over a century later still makes her own bed every morning.
“I’m doing alright,” she told local daily The Sowetan during a recent visit to her house in the small town of Klerksdorp, northwest of Johannesburg.
She is the oldest of 10 siblings, and has outlived five of her own seven children.
“God gave my life in abundance, plus a bonus. I am very old now,” she said.
Her son Tseko, himself a ripe 77, who lives with his mother, said that “she is able to move on her own but cannot stand for a long time. She gets dizzy.”
Despite her age, Mazibuko cooks and dresses herself, and even does the laundry.
The rest of the day she watches television.
A tattered green ID book gives her date of birth as May 11, 1894. It was issued in 1986.
South Africa’s home affairs ministry could not immediately confirm the authenticity of Mazibuko’s identity documents, of which AFP has seen a copy.
The world’s oldest known person, 116-year-old Jiroemon Kimura from Japan, died in June.
Born in 1897, he worked at a post office for 40 years and after his retirement took up farming until he turned 90.
His hometown Kyotango is planning to do research into the reasons for its citizens’ longevity.
Besides Kimura 94 other people in his hometown will this year be 100 years old or older.

Also on HuffPost:

								“;
	var coords = [-5, -72];
	// display fb-bubble
	FloatingPrompt.embed(this, html, undefined, ‘top’, {fp_intersects:1, timeout_remove:2000,ignore_arrow: true, width:236, add_xy:coords, class_name: ‘clear-overlay’});
});

http://www.bizzarenews.net/woman-claims-to-be-the-worlds-oldest-person-3/

Woman Claims To Be The World’s Oldest Person

Having lived through British imperialism, apartheid and the era of democracy led by Nelson Mandela, a 119-year-old South African woman has a claim to be the world’s oldest person.

Johanna Mazibuko was born in 1894, according to her identity papers, but over a century later still makes her own bed every morning.

“I’m doing alright,” she told local daily The Sowetan during a recent visit to her house in the small town of Klerksdorp, northwest of Johannesburg.

She is the oldest of 10 siblings, and has outlived five of her own seven children.

“God gave my life in abundance, plus a bonus. I am very old now,” she said.

Her son Tseko, himself a ripe 77, who lives with his mother, said that “she is able to move on her own but cannot stand for a long time. She gets dizzy.”

Despite her age, Mazibuko cooks and dresses herself, and even does the laundry.

The rest of the day she watches television.

A tattered green ID book gives her date of birth as May 11, 1894. It was issued in 1986.

South Africa’s home affairs ministry could not immediately confirm the authenticity of Mazibuko’s identity documents, of which AFP has seen a copy.

The world’s oldest known person, 116-year-old Jiroemon Kimura from Japan, died in June.

Born in 1897, he worked at a post office for 40 years and after his retirement took up farming until he turned 90.

His hometown Kyotango is planning to do research into the reasons for its citizens’ longevity.

Besides Kimura 94 other people in his hometown will this year be 100 years old or older.



Also on HuffPost:

“;
var coords = [-5, -72];
// display fb-bubble
FloatingPrompt.embed(this, html, undefined, ‘top’, {fp_intersects:1, timeout_remove:2000,ignore_arrow: true, width:236, add_xy:coords, class_name: ‘clear-overlay’});
});

http://www.bizzarenews.net/woman-claims-to-be-the-worlds-oldest-person-2/Woman Claims To Be The World’s Oldest Person


				                    


Having lived through British imperialism, apartheid and the era of democracy led by Nelson Mandela, a 119-year-old South African woman has a claim to be the world’s oldest person.
Johanna Mazibuko was born in 1894, according to her identity papers, but over a century later still makes her own bed every morning.
“I’m doing alright,” she told local daily The Sowetan during a recent visit to her house in the small town of Klerksdorp, northwest of Johannesburg.
She is the oldest of 10 siblings, and has outlived five of her own seven children.
“God gave my life in abundance, plus a bonus. I am very old now,” she said.
Her son Tseko, himself a ripe 77, who lives with his mother, said that “she is able to move on her own but cannot stand for a long time. She gets dizzy.”
Despite her age, Mazibuko cooks and dresses herself, and even does the laundry.
The rest of the day she watches television.
A tattered green ID book gives her date of birth as May 11, 1894. It was issued in 1986.
South Africa’s home affairs ministry could not immediately confirm the authenticity of Mazibuko’s identity documents, of which AFP has seen a copy.
The world’s oldest known person, 116-year-old Jiroemon Kimura from Japan, died in June.
Born in 1897, he worked at a post office for 40 years and after his retirement took up farming until he turned 90.
His hometown Kyotango is planning to do research into the reasons for its citizens’ longevity.
Besides Kimura 94 other people in his hometown will this year be 100 years old or older.

Also on HuffPost:

								“;
	var coords = [-5, -72];
	// display fb-bubble
	FloatingPrompt.embed(this, html, undefined, ‘top’, {fp_intersects:1, timeout_remove:2000,ignore_arrow: true, width:236, add_xy:coords, class_name: ‘clear-overlay’});
});

http://www.bizzarenews.net/woman-claims-to-be-the-worlds-oldest-person-2/

Woman Claims To Be The World’s Oldest Person

Having lived through British imperialism, apartheid and the era of democracy led by Nelson Mandela, a 119-year-old South African woman has a claim to be the world’s oldest person.

Johanna Mazibuko was born in 1894, according to her identity papers, but over a century later still makes her own bed every morning.

“I’m doing alright,” she told local daily The Sowetan during a recent visit to her house in the small town of Klerksdorp, northwest of Johannesburg.

She is the oldest of 10 siblings, and has outlived five of her own seven children.

“God gave my life in abundance, plus a bonus. I am very old now,” she said.

Her son Tseko, himself a ripe 77, who lives with his mother, said that “she is able to move on her own but cannot stand for a long time. She gets dizzy.”

Despite her age, Mazibuko cooks and dresses herself, and even does the laundry.

The rest of the day she watches television.

A tattered green ID book gives her date of birth as May 11, 1894. It was issued in 1986.

South Africa’s home affairs ministry could not immediately confirm the authenticity of Mazibuko’s identity documents, of which AFP has seen a copy.

The world’s oldest known person, 116-year-old Jiroemon Kimura from Japan, died in June.

Born in 1897, he worked at a post office for 40 years and after his retirement took up farming until he turned 90.

His hometown Kyotango is planning to do research into the reasons for its citizens’ longevity.

Besides Kimura 94 other people in his hometown will this year be 100 years old or older.



Also on HuffPost:

“;
var coords = [-5, -72];
// display fb-bubble
FloatingPrompt.embed(this, html, undefined, ‘top’, {fp_intersects:1, timeout_remove:2000,ignore_arrow: true, width:236, add_xy:coords, class_name: ‘clear-overlay’});
});

http://www.bizzarenews.net/woman-claims-to-be-the-worlds-oldest-person/Woman Claims To Be The World’s Oldest Person


				                    


Having lived through British imperialism, apartheid and the era of democracy led by Nelson Mandela, a 119-year-old South African woman has a claim to be the world’s oldest person.
Johanna Mazibuko was born in 1894, according to her identity papers, but over a century later still makes her own bed every morning.
“I’m doing alright,” she told local daily The Sowetan during a recent visit to her house in the small town of Klerksdorp, northwest of Johannesburg.
She is the oldest of 10 siblings, and has outlived five of her own seven children.
“God gave my life in abundance, plus a bonus. I am very old now,” she said.
Her son Tseko, himself a ripe 77, who lives with his mother, said that “she is able to move on her own but cannot stand for a long time. She gets dizzy.”
Despite her age, Mazibuko cooks and dresses herself, and even does the laundry.
The rest of the day she watches television.
A tattered green ID book gives her date of birth as May 11, 1894. It was issued in 1986.
South Africa’s home affairs ministry could not immediately confirm the authenticity of Mazibuko’s identity documents, of which AFP has seen a copy.
The world’s oldest known person, 116-year-old Jiroemon Kimura from Japan, died in June.
Born in 1897, he worked at a post office for 40 years and after his retirement took up farming until he turned 90.
His hometown Kyotango is planning to do research into the reasons for its citizens’ longevity.
Besides Kimura 94 other people in his hometown will this year be 100 years old or older.

Also on HuffPost:

								“;
	var coords = [-5, -72];
	// display fb-bubble
	FloatingPrompt.embed(this, html, undefined, ‘top’, {fp_intersects:1, timeout_remove:2000,ignore_arrow: true, width:236, add_xy:coords, class_name: ‘clear-overlay’});
});

http://www.bizzarenews.net/woman-claims-to-be-the-worlds-oldest-person/

Woman Claims To Be The World’s Oldest Person

Having lived through British imperialism, apartheid and the era of democracy led by Nelson Mandela, a 119-year-old South African woman has a claim to be the world’s oldest person.

Johanna Mazibuko was born in 1894, according to her identity papers, but over a century later still makes her own bed every morning.

“I’m doing alright,” she told local daily The Sowetan during a recent visit to her house in the small town of Klerksdorp, northwest of Johannesburg.

She is the oldest of 10 siblings, and has outlived five of her own seven children.

“God gave my life in abundance, plus a bonus. I am very old now,” she said.

Her son Tseko, himself a ripe 77, who lives with his mother, said that “she is able to move on her own but cannot stand for a long time. She gets dizzy.”

Despite her age, Mazibuko cooks and dresses herself, and even does the laundry.

The rest of the day she watches television.

A tattered green ID book gives her date of birth as May 11, 1894. It was issued in 1986.

South Africa’s home affairs ministry could not immediately confirm the authenticity of Mazibuko’s identity documents, of which AFP has seen a copy.

The world’s oldest known person, 116-year-old Jiroemon Kimura from Japan, died in June.

Born in 1897, he worked at a post office for 40 years and after his retirement took up farming until he turned 90.

His hometown Kyotango is planning to do research into the reasons for its citizens’ longevity.

Besides Kimura 94 other people in his hometown will this year be 100 years old or older.



Also on HuffPost:

“;
var coords = [-5, -72];
// display fb-bubble
FloatingPrompt.embed(this, html, undefined, ‘top’, {fp_intersects:1, timeout_remove:2000,ignore_arrow: true, width:236, add_xy:coords, class_name: ‘clear-overlay’});
});

http://www.bizzarenews.net/woman-claims-to-be-the-worlds-oldest-person-2/Woman Claims To Be The World’s Oldest Person


				                    


Having lived through British imperialism, apartheid and the era of democracy led by Nelson Mandela, a 119-year-old South African woman has a claim to be the world’s oldest person.
Johanna Mazibuko was born in 1894, according to her identity papers, but over a century later still makes her own bed every morning.
“I’m doing alright,” she told local daily The Sowetan during a recent visit to her house in the small town of Klerksdorp, northwest of Johannesburg.
She is the oldest of 10 siblings, and has outlived five of her own seven children.
“God gave my life in abundance, plus a bonus. I am very old now,” she said.
Her son Tseko, himself a ripe 77, who lives with his mother, said that “she is able to move on her own but cannot stand for a long time. She gets dizzy.”
Despite her age, Mazibuko cooks and dresses herself, and even does the laundry.
The rest of the day she watches television.
A tattered green ID book gives her date of birth as May 11, 1894. It was issued in 1986.
South Africa’s home affairs ministry could not immediately confirm the authenticity of Mazibuko’s identity documents, of which AFP has seen a copy.
The world’s oldest known person, 116-year-old Jiroemon Kimura from Japan, died in June.
Born in 1897, he worked at a post office for 40 years and after his retirement took up farming until he turned 90.
His hometown Kyotango is planning to do research into the reasons for its citizens’ longevity.
Besides Kimura 94 other people in his hometown will this year be 100 years old or older.

Also on HuffPost:

								“;
	var coords = [-5, -72];
	// display fb-bubble
	FloatingPrompt.embed(this, html, undefined, ‘top’, {fp_intersects:1, timeout_remove:2000,ignore_arrow: true, width:236, add_xy:coords, class_name: ‘clear-overlay’});
});

http://www.bizzarenews.net/woman-claims-to-be-the-worlds-oldest-person-2/

Woman Claims To Be The World’s Oldest Person

Having lived through British imperialism, apartheid and the era of democracy led by Nelson Mandela, a 119-year-old South African woman has a claim to be the world’s oldest person.

Johanna Mazibuko was born in 1894, according to her identity papers, but over a century later still makes her own bed every morning.

“I’m doing alright,” she told local daily The Sowetan during a recent visit to her house in the small town of Klerksdorp, northwest of Johannesburg.

She is the oldest of 10 siblings, and has outlived five of her own seven children.

“God gave my life in abundance, plus a bonus. I am very old now,” she said.

Her son Tseko, himself a ripe 77, who lives with his mother, said that “she is able to move on her own but cannot stand for a long time. She gets dizzy.”

Despite her age, Mazibuko cooks and dresses herself, and even does the laundry.

The rest of the day she watches television.

A tattered green ID book gives her date of birth as May 11, 1894. It was issued in 1986.

South Africa’s home affairs ministry could not immediately confirm the authenticity of Mazibuko’s identity documents, of which AFP has seen a copy.

The world’s oldest known person, 116-year-old Jiroemon Kimura from Japan, died in June.

Born in 1897, he worked at a post office for 40 years and after his retirement took up farming until he turned 90.

His hometown Kyotango is planning to do research into the reasons for its citizens’ longevity.

Besides Kimura 94 other people in his hometown will this year be 100 years old or older.



Also on HuffPost:

“;
var coords = [-5, -72];
// display fb-bubble
FloatingPrompt.embed(this, html, undefined, ‘top’, {fp_intersects:1, timeout_remove:2000,ignore_arrow: true, width:236, add_xy:coords, class_name: ‘clear-overlay’});
});

http://www.bizzarenews.net/watch-fruit-bat-babies-drinking-from-tiny-bottles-2/WATCH: Fruit Bat Babies Drinking From Tiny Bottles


				                    


Bats generally get a pretty bad rap among humans — we accuse them of sucking our blood, getting stuck in our hair and scaring the living daylights out of Christian Bale. But a video released by friends of the Australian Bat Clinic earlier this year and now going viral online, shows that bats — at least orphaned baby fruit bats — are just as adorable as your average BuzzFeed cute animal list.
The clip shows Bat Clinic worker (and fruit bat surrogate mother) Trish Wimberley, whose job entails looking caring for the babies until they can be released back into the wild.
From the YouTube description:
Trish Wimberley looks after hundreds of orphaned baby bats and rears them until they can be released into the wild. It’s a tireless, never ending job which keeps her awake all hours (she apparently went 3 nights without sleeping once). A typical day may include feeding (the food is about $1000 a week), health checks, doing their laundry (the dryer and washing machine electricity bill costs up to $8000 every 3 or 4 months!), bat transportation for release — everything they need in order to survive. 
A unique mammal given its ability to fly, fruit bats — sometimes known as flying-foxes – are part of the Megachiroptera suborder, according to Brittanica. In Australia, there are about a dozen different species of the large bats, eating mostly plant products including fruits, flowers and nectar, according to the Australian government’s Department of Sustainability and Environment.
The animals are essential to maintaining the Australian ecosystem, according to the Department of Sustainability and Environment, as they spread pollen and seeds over long distances, facilitating germination.
They are vulnerable when young and can easily become orphaned, as were a group of 98 fruit bats were rescued by an animal hospital in Brisbane, Australia in 2011. 
(h/t Jezebel)
Also on HuffPost:

								“;
	var coords = [-5, -72];
	// display fb-bubble
	FloatingPrompt.embed(this, html, undefined, ‘top’, {fp_intersects:1, timeout_remove:2000,ignore_arrow: true, width:236, add_xy:coords, class_name: ‘clear-overlay’});
});

http://www.bizzarenews.net/watch-fruit-bat-babies-drinking-from-tiny-bottles-2/

WATCH: Fruit Bat Babies Drinking From Tiny Bottles

Bats generally get a pretty bad rap among humans — we accuse them of sucking our blood, getting stuck in our hair and scaring the living daylights out of Christian Bale. But a video released by friends of the Australian Bat Clinic earlier this year and now going viral online, shows that bats — at least orphaned baby fruit bats — are just as adorable as your average BuzzFeed cute animal list.

The clip shows Bat Clinic worker (and fruit bat surrogate mother) Trish Wimberley, whose job entails looking caring for the babies until they can be released back into the wild.

From the YouTube description:

Trish Wimberley looks after hundreds of orphaned baby bats and rears them until they can be released into the wild. It’s a tireless, never ending job which keeps her awake all hours (she apparently went 3 nights without sleeping once). A typical day may include feeding (the food is about $1000 a week), health checks, doing their laundry (the dryer and washing machine electricity bill costs up to $8000 every 3 or 4 months!), bat transportation for release — everything they need in order to survive.

A unique mammal given its ability to fly, fruit bats — sometimes known as flying-foxes – are part of the Megachiroptera suborder, according to Brittanica. In Australia, there are about a dozen different species of the large bats, eating mostly plant products including fruits, flowers and nectar, according to the Australian government’s Department of Sustainability and Environment.

The animals are essential to maintaining the Australian ecosystem, according to the Department of Sustainability and Environment, as they spread pollen and seeds over long distances, facilitating germination.

They are vulnerable when young and can easily become orphaned, as were a group of 98 fruit bats were rescued by an animal hospital in Brisbane, Australia in 2011.

(h/t Jezebel)

Also on HuffPost:

“;
var coords = [-5, -72];
// display fb-bubble
FloatingPrompt.embed(this, html, undefined, ‘top’, {fp_intersects:1, timeout_remove:2000,ignore_arrow: true, width:236, add_xy:coords, class_name: ‘clear-overlay’});
});

http://www.bizzarenews.net/watch-fruit-bat-babies-drinking-from-tiny-bottles-2/WATCH: Fruit Bat Babies Drinking From Tiny Bottles


				                    


Bats generally get a pretty bad rap among humans — we accuse them of sucking our blood, getting stuck in our hair and scaring the living daylights out of Christian Bale. But a video released by friends of the Australian Bat Clinic earlier this year and now going viral online, shows that bats — at least orphaned baby fruit bats — are just as adorable as your average BuzzFeed cute animal list.
The clip shows Bat Clinic worker (and fruit bat surrogate mother) Trish Wimberley, whose job entails looking caring for the babies until they can be released back into the wild.
From the YouTube description:
Trish Wimberley looks after hundreds of orphaned baby bats and rears them until they can be released into the wild. It’s a tireless, never ending job which keeps her awake all hours (she apparently went 3 nights without sleeping once). A typical day may include feeding (the food is about $1000 a week), health checks, doing their laundry (the dryer and washing machine electricity bill costs up to $8000 every 3 or 4 months!), bat transportation for release — everything they need in order to survive. 
A unique mammal given its ability to fly, fruit bats — sometimes known as flying-foxes – are part of the Megachiroptera suborder, according to Brittanica. In Australia, there are about a dozen different species of the large bats, eating mostly plant products including fruits, flowers and nectar, according to the Australian government’s Department of Sustainability and Environment.
The animals are essential to maintaining the Australian ecosystem, according to the Department of Sustainability and Environment, as they spread pollen and seeds over long distances, facilitating germination.
They are vulnerable when young and can easily become orphaned, as were a group of 98 fruit bats were rescued by an animal hospital in Brisbane, Australia in 2011. 
(h/t Jezebel)
Also on HuffPost:

								“;
	var coords = [-5, -72];
	// display fb-bubble
	FloatingPrompt.embed(this, html, undefined, ‘top’, {fp_intersects:1, timeout_remove:2000,ignore_arrow: true, width:236, add_xy:coords, class_name: ‘clear-overlay’});
});

http://www.bizzarenews.net/watch-fruit-bat-babies-drinking-from-tiny-bottles-2/

WATCH: Fruit Bat Babies Drinking From Tiny Bottles

Bats generally get a pretty bad rap among humans — we accuse them of sucking our blood, getting stuck in our hair and scaring the living daylights out of Christian Bale. But a video released by friends of the Australian Bat Clinic earlier this year and now going viral online, shows that bats — at least orphaned baby fruit bats — are just as adorable as your average BuzzFeed cute animal list.

The clip shows Bat Clinic worker (and fruit bat surrogate mother) Trish Wimberley, whose job entails looking caring for the babies until they can be released back into the wild.

From the YouTube description:

Trish Wimberley looks after hundreds of orphaned baby bats and rears them until they can be released into the wild. It’s a tireless, never ending job which keeps her awake all hours (she apparently went 3 nights without sleeping once). A typical day may include feeding (the food is about $1000 a week), health checks, doing their laundry (the dryer and washing machine electricity bill costs up to $8000 every 3 or 4 months!), bat transportation for release — everything they need in order to survive.

A unique mammal given its ability to fly, fruit bats — sometimes known as flying-foxes – are part of the Megachiroptera suborder, according to Brittanica. In Australia, there are about a dozen different species of the large bats, eating mostly plant products including fruits, flowers and nectar, according to the Australian government’s Department of Sustainability and Environment.

The animals are essential to maintaining the Australian ecosystem, according to the Department of Sustainability and Environment, as they spread pollen and seeds over long distances, facilitating germination.

They are vulnerable when young and can easily become orphaned, as were a group of 98 fruit bats were rescued by an animal hospital in Brisbane, Australia in 2011.

(h/t Jezebel)

Also on HuffPost:

“;
var coords = [-5, -72];
// display fb-bubble
FloatingPrompt.embed(this, html, undefined, ‘top’, {fp_intersects:1, timeout_remove:2000,ignore_arrow: true, width:236, add_xy:coords, class_name: ‘clear-overlay’});
});

http://www.bizzarenews.net/watch-fruit-bat-babies-drinking-from-tiny-bottles-2/WATCH: Fruit Bat Babies Drinking From Tiny Bottles


				                    


Bats generally get a pretty bad rap among humans — we accuse them of sucking our blood, getting stuck in our hair and scaring the living daylights out of Christian Bale. But a video released by friends of the Australian Bat Clinic earlier this year and now going viral online, shows that bats — at least orphaned baby fruit bats — are just as adorable as your average BuzzFeed cute animal list.
The clip shows Bat Clinic worker (and fruit bat surrogate mother) Trish Wimberley, whose job entails looking caring for the babies until they can be released back into the wild.
From the YouTube description:
Trish Wimberley looks after hundreds of orphaned baby bats and rears them until they can be released into the wild. It’s a tireless, never ending job which keeps her awake all hours (she apparently went 3 nights without sleeping once). A typical day may include feeding (the food is about $1000 a week), health checks, doing their laundry (the dryer and washing machine electricity bill costs up to $8000 every 3 or 4 months!), bat transportation for release — everything they need in order to survive. 
A unique mammal given its ability to fly, fruit bats — sometimes known as flying-foxes – are part of the Megachiroptera suborder, according to Brittanica. In Australia, there are about a dozen different species of the large bats, eating mostly plant products including fruits, flowers and nectar, according to the Australian government’s Department of Sustainability and Environment.
The animals are essential to maintaining the Australian ecosystem, according to the Department of Sustainability and Environment, as they spread pollen and seeds over long distances, facilitating germination.
They are vulnerable when young and can easily become orphaned, as were a group of 98 fruit bats were rescued by an animal hospital in Brisbane, Australia in 2011. 
(h/t Jezebel)
Also on HuffPost:

								“;
	var coords = [-5, -72];
	// display fb-bubble
	FloatingPrompt.embed(this, html, undefined, ‘top’, {fp_intersects:1, timeout_remove:2000,ignore_arrow: true, width:236, add_xy:coords, class_name: ‘clear-overlay’});
});

http://www.bizzarenews.net/watch-fruit-bat-babies-drinking-from-tiny-bottles-2/

WATCH: Fruit Bat Babies Drinking From Tiny Bottles

Bats generally get a pretty bad rap among humans — we accuse them of sucking our blood, getting stuck in our hair and scaring the living daylights out of Christian Bale. But a video released by friends of the Australian Bat Clinic earlier this year and now going viral online, shows that bats — at least orphaned baby fruit bats — are just as adorable as your average BuzzFeed cute animal list.

The clip shows Bat Clinic worker (and fruit bat surrogate mother) Trish Wimberley, whose job entails looking caring for the babies until they can be released back into the wild.

From the YouTube description:

Trish Wimberley looks after hundreds of orphaned baby bats and rears them until they can be released into the wild. It’s a tireless, never ending job which keeps her awake all hours (she apparently went 3 nights without sleeping once). A typical day may include feeding (the food is about $1000 a week), health checks, doing their laundry (the dryer and washing machine electricity bill costs up to $8000 every 3 or 4 months!), bat transportation for release — everything they need in order to survive.

A unique mammal given its ability to fly, fruit bats — sometimes known as flying-foxes – are part of the Megachiroptera suborder, according to Brittanica. In Australia, there are about a dozen different species of the large bats, eating mostly plant products including fruits, flowers and nectar, according to the Australian government’s Department of Sustainability and Environment.

The animals are essential to maintaining the Australian ecosystem, according to the Department of Sustainability and Environment, as they spread pollen and seeds over long distances, facilitating germination.

They are vulnerable when young and can easily become orphaned, as were a group of 98 fruit bats were rescued by an animal hospital in Brisbane, Australia in 2011.

(h/t Jezebel)

Also on HuffPost:

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http://www.bizzarenews.net/watch-fruit-bat-babies-drinking-from-tiny-bottles-3/WATCH: Fruit Bat Babies Drinking From Tiny Bottles


				                    


Bats generally get a pretty bad rap among humans — we accuse them of sucking our blood, getting stuck in our hair and scaring the living daylights out of Christian Bale. But a video released by friends of the Australian Bat Clinic earlier this year and now going viral online, shows that bats — at least orphaned baby fruit bats — are just as adorable as your average BuzzFeed cute animal list.
The clip shows Bat Clinic worker (and fruit bat surrogate mother) Trish Wimberley, whose job entails looking caring for the babies until they can be released back into the wild.
From the YouTube description:
Trish Wimberley looks after hundreds of orphaned baby bats and rears them until they can be released into the wild. It’s a tireless, never ending job which keeps her awake all hours (she apparently went 3 nights without sleeping once). A typical day may include feeding (the food is about $1000 a week), health checks, doing their laundry (the dryer and washing machine electricity bill costs up to $8000 every 3 or 4 months!), bat transportation for release — everything they need in order to survive. 
A unique mammal given its ability to fly, fruit bats — sometimes known as flying-foxes – are part of the Megachiroptera suborder, according to Brittanica. In Australia, there are about a dozen different species of the large bats, eating mostly plant products including fruits, flowers and nectar, according to the Australian government’s Department of Sustainability and Environment.
The animals are essential to maintaining the Australian ecosystem, according to the Department of Sustainability and Environment, as they spread pollen and seeds over long distances, facilitating germination.
They are vulnerable when young and can easily become orphaned, as were a group of 98 fruit bats were rescued by an animal hospital in Brisbane, Australia in 2011. 
(h/t Jezebel)
Also on HuffPost:

								“;
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});

http://www.bizzarenews.net/watch-fruit-bat-babies-drinking-from-tiny-bottles-3/

WATCH: Fruit Bat Babies Drinking From Tiny Bottles

Bats generally get a pretty bad rap among humans — we accuse them of sucking our blood, getting stuck in our hair and scaring the living daylights out of Christian Bale. But a video released by friends of the Australian Bat Clinic earlier this year and now going viral online, shows that bats — at least orphaned baby fruit bats — are just as adorable as your average BuzzFeed cute animal list.

The clip shows Bat Clinic worker (and fruit bat surrogate mother) Trish Wimberley, whose job entails looking caring for the babies until they can be released back into the wild.

From the YouTube description:

Trish Wimberley looks after hundreds of orphaned baby bats and rears them until they can be released into the wild. It’s a tireless, never ending job which keeps her awake all hours (she apparently went 3 nights without sleeping once). A typical day may include feeding (the food is about $1000 a week), health checks, doing their laundry (the dryer and washing machine electricity bill costs up to $8000 every 3 or 4 months!), bat transportation for release — everything they need in order to survive.

A unique mammal given its ability to fly, fruit bats — sometimes known as flying-foxes – are part of the Megachiroptera suborder, according to Brittanica. In Australia, there are about a dozen different species of the large bats, eating mostly plant products including fruits, flowers and nectar, according to the Australian government’s Department of Sustainability and Environment.

The animals are essential to maintaining the Australian ecosystem, according to the Department of Sustainability and Environment, as they spread pollen and seeds over long distances, facilitating germination.

They are vulnerable when young and can easily become orphaned, as were a group of 98 fruit bats were rescued by an animal hospital in Brisbane, Australia in 2011.

(h/t Jezebel)

Also on HuffPost:

“;
var coords = [-5, -72];
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FloatingPrompt.embed(this, html, undefined, ‘top’, {fp_intersects:1, timeout_remove:2000,ignore_arrow: true, width:236, add_xy:coords, class_name: ‘clear-overlay’});
});

http://www.bizzarenews.net/watch-fruit-bat-babies-drinking-from-tiny-bottles/WATCH: Fruit Bat Babies Drinking From Tiny Bottles


				                    


Bats generally get a pretty bad rap among humans — we accuse them of sucking our blood, getting stuck in our hair and scaring the living daylights out of Christian Bale. But a video released by friends of the Australian Bat Clinic earlier this year and now going viral online, shows that bats — at least orphaned baby fruit bats — are just as adorable as your average BuzzFeed cute animal list.
The clip shows Bat Clinic worker (and fruit bat surrogate mother) Trish Wimberley, whose job entails looking caring for the babies until they can be released back into the wild.
From the YouTube description:
Trish Wimberley looks after hundreds of orphaned baby bats and rears them until they can be released into the wild. It’s a tireless, never ending job which keeps her awake all hours (she apparently went 3 nights without sleeping once). A typical day may include feeding (the food is about $1000 a week), health checks, doing their laundry (the dryer and washing machine electricity bill costs up to $8000 every 3 or 4 months!), bat transportation for release — everything they need in order to survive. 
A unique mammal given its ability to fly, fruit bats — sometimes known as flying-foxes – are part of the Megachiroptera suborder, according to Brittanica. In Australia, there are about a dozen different species of the large bats, eating mostly plant products including fruits, flowers and nectar, according to the Australian government’s Department of Sustainability and Environment.
The animals are essential to maintaining the Australian ecosystem, according to the Department of Sustainability and Environment, as they spread pollen and seeds over long distances, facilitating germination.
They are vulnerable when young and can easily become orphaned, as were a group of 98 fruit bats were rescued by an animal hospital in Brisbane, Australia in 2011. 
(h/t Jezebel)
Also on HuffPost:

								“;
	var coords = [-5, -72];
	// display fb-bubble
	FloatingPrompt.embed(this, html, undefined, ‘top’, {fp_intersects:1, timeout_remove:2000,ignore_arrow: true, width:236, add_xy:coords, class_name: ‘clear-overlay’});
});

http://www.bizzarenews.net/watch-fruit-bat-babies-drinking-from-tiny-bottles/

WATCH: Fruit Bat Babies Drinking From Tiny Bottles

Bats generally get a pretty bad rap among humans — we accuse them of sucking our blood, getting stuck in our hair and scaring the living daylights out of Christian Bale. But a video released by friends of the Australian Bat Clinic earlier this year and now going viral online, shows that bats — at least orphaned baby fruit bats — are just as adorable as your average BuzzFeed cute animal list.

The clip shows Bat Clinic worker (and fruit bat surrogate mother) Trish Wimberley, whose job entails looking caring for the babies until they can be released back into the wild.

From the YouTube description:

Trish Wimberley looks after hundreds of orphaned baby bats and rears them until they can be released into the wild. It’s a tireless, never ending job which keeps her awake all hours (she apparently went 3 nights without sleeping once). A typical day may include feeding (the food is about $1000 a week), health checks, doing their laundry (the dryer and washing machine electricity bill costs up to $8000 every 3 or 4 months!), bat transportation for release — everything they need in order to survive.

A unique mammal given its ability to fly, fruit bats — sometimes known as flying-foxes – are part of the Megachiroptera suborder, according to Brittanica. In Australia, there are about a dozen different species of the large bats, eating mostly plant products including fruits, flowers and nectar, according to the Australian government’s Department of Sustainability and Environment.

The animals are essential to maintaining the Australian ecosystem, according to the Department of Sustainability and Environment, as they spread pollen and seeds over long distances, facilitating germination.

They are vulnerable when young and can easily become orphaned, as were a group of 98 fruit bats were rescued by an animal hospital in Brisbane, Australia in 2011.

(h/t Jezebel)

Also on HuffPost:

“;
var coords = [-5, -72];
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